Archive for January, 2009

Books for the new year Part 2

Monday, January 26th, 2009

My absolute favorite book on personal finance is The Richest Man in Babylon.  It’s a good story which helps the financial principles stick.  I love the simplicity.  There are plenty of good books that get into the details of which funds are most appropriate in your 401k.  Richest Man is not one of those books.  This book gives basic steps that you can take now to move toward financial independence.

Some of the timeless advice:

1.  Decide to improve your financial lot in life.

2.  Save at least 10% of your income.

3.  Come up with a plan to pay back your debts while keeping your living expenses low.

4.  Make sound investments with your 10% savings.

I have read this book each year for the past several and will continue to do so.  Please join me.

Books for the new year Part 1

Monday, January 19th, 2009

Some books beg to be read over and over.  This week I’ve been reviewing sections of The Abs Diet.  After the holidays it’s time to revive the old metabolism.

Here’s what I like about The Abs Diet:

1.  Recipes for healthy eating.  Helps break up the monotony of protein shakes and chicken.

2.  Pictures and instructions for tons of exercises.  Since one should mix up his/her routine every month or so, I’m always interested in new workouts.

3.  An easy read.  The Abs Diet is written for the regular guy.

What’s your favorite health book?

Next up…my favorite finance book.

Football paychecks

Monday, January 12th, 2009

So I’m watching the NFL playoffs this weekend.

This weekend I’ve been researching, among other things, information marketing…selling ebooks.  One of the mental hurdles for me has been why would anyone want to pay $29 – $149 or more for information from little ole me.  Is my knowledge really worth that much to people?  Maybe…thoughts below.

Back to football:

  1. The stands are packed with people who have spent hundreds of dollars to sit in the cold and watch a bunch of overgrown men tackle each other for three hours.   Most of these fans are not millionaires or family members of the players.  Just regular guys and girls having fun.  The point is that we have money for what we want to have money for.
  2. The guys we’re watching are being paid huge paychecks to entertain us once a week for six months.  Ben Roethlisberger gets over $27 MILLION this year for playing football.  I bring this up for perspective.  A person’s talent is worth exactly what someone else is willing to pay.  No more, no less.

Application:

Okay.  Here are my takeaways from the football games.

People have money for what they really want and many are willing to drop hundreds of dollars on a day of entertainment.

If I can provide enough value, my potential payoff is virtually limitless.  Seriously, Big Ben–$27million for some football games.  Ben hasn’t even been very good this year.

Next steps:

What is it that I know that others would be willing to pay for?

In what format is that information most saleable?

Disclaimer:  I’m not knocking football…I watch the Steelers on TV every Sunday.

Brave New World

Wednesday, January 7th, 2009

Over the past week I used some of my holiday time off to experiment with expanding my cyberworld presence:

  • Opened an account on WordPress.  Seems to be fairly easy platform to pick up, but I am playing with different themes and learning how to tweak the site to reflect simple functionality as I envision it.
  • Posted my first blog.  Nothing fancy, but everyone starts somewhere.
  • Registered my first domain name…nathanmartinblog.com.  I used GoDaddy and found it to be relatively simple.
  • Signed up on Twitter…@nathanemartin.  Still don’t see how this applies, but I’ll give it a fair try.

So what’s next?

  1. Clean up and pretty up my blogsite.
  2. Link all digital outposts together.  I’ve been on Facebook, LinkedIn, MySpace, and some others for a while…time to pull them all together.
  3. Begin posting on other blogs.  I need to join in the conversations to learn how this all works and to make connections in the areas of interest that I hope to influence.

What else am I missing?  See you out there.